What We Talk About When We Talk About Architecture

February 12, 2021 Ι Architects Newspaper  In early June, I put on a white KN95 mask and a black sweater and left my apartment like thousands of other Chicagoans to protest the murder of Black Americans by police. An hour or so of marching and chanting culminated at an intersection near my home dominated by […]

Who’s Around Underground?

February 2021 Ι Landscape Architecture Magazine  Republic Square in Austin, Texas, is one of the city’s most historic, sensitive, and heavily trafficked public green spaces. In the heart of downtown, it’s one of the original four public squares dating back to the city’s founding. In 1839, the city’s initial run of surveyed and platted blocks […]

Design Trust Chicago seeks to address systems beyond structures

Architect’s Newspaper Ι December 30, 2020 The recently unveiled Design Trust Chicago will coordinate the work of Chicago’s activist designers, placing community, racial equity, and social justice ahead of for-profit, developer-led agendas. Publicly announced in November, the Design Trust was founded by Katherine Darnstadt of Latent Design, and Elle Ramel and Paola Aguirre of City […]

Shanghai’s Longhua Airport Is Converted into a New Public Park

Metropolis Magazine Ι November 30, 2020 At Xuhui Runway Park on the banks of Shanghai’s Huangpu River, in the middle of one of the largest cities in the world, it’s impossible to miss the history of what came before. Designed by Sasaki, Xuhui offers a palimpsest of a reused airport, preserving its materials and forms. […]

In One of Chicago’s Most Affluent Neighborhoods, Hidden Stories of Resistance Unveiled By App

Next City Ι November 20, 2020 The Armitage-Halsted historic district in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood is renowned for its well-preserved collection of 19th-century architecture and commercial streetscapes, filled with Victoria-era ornamentation, pressed metal bays, and classic Chicago corner turrets. Today, Lincoln Park is a thoroughly gentrified site of winners-circle complacency; dog parks, stroller moms in […]

The Divining Rod

Landscape Architecture Magazine Ι November 2020 Like a lot of landscape architects, Stephen McCarthy spends much of his time managing hydrology and restoring native ecologies. The sites he works on, in Milwaukee’s exurban fringe, are often landscapes of subtle differences: gentle rises and shallow streams, small agricultural plots hemmed in by hills and wetlands. At […]

Generational Lines In The Sand

Architect’s Newspaper Ι Oct. 5, 2020 When the Board of Directors of AIA Chicago fired long-time Executive Vice President Zurich Esposito in August, it surprised many in the city’s architecture community, for whom Esposito had been a successful and effective chapter leader. Esposito’s abrupt dismissal left many questions in its wake, foremost among them what […]

Design Crit

The Architect’s Newspaper Ι Oct. 28, 2020 During the Great Depression, the policymakers pushing the New Deal sought out conservative areas most suspicious of the plan and signed them up for buckets of federal funding first, effectively turning detractors into supporters. The New Deal’s would-be 21st-century sequel, the Green New Deal (GND), will have to […]

How America’s Schools Got So Sick

Bloomberg’s CityLab Ι Sept. 25, 2020 This fall, the usual back-to-school anxieties have been coupled with a new one in the U.S., as wide swaths of the populace are desperately asking if their child’s classrooms can provide any level of safety. In many major U.S. cities, public school buildings remain fully or partially closed for […]

Chicago’s Wrightwood 659 Hosts Compelling Exhibition of Indian Master Doshi

Architectural Record Ι Sept. 16, 2020 As the first Pritzker Prize laureate from the south Asian subcontinent, with a seven-decade career, Balkrishna Doshi is easily viewed as a Modernist standard bearer for Indian architecture. And Balkrishna Doshi: Architecture for the People now at Chicago’s Wrightwood 659 (its only stop in North America) plays up Doshi’s […]